Oh, the Thinks You Can Think

Happy National Library Week!

ImageFounded in 1958 by the American Library Association, National Library Week grew out of a desire to encourage more Americans to read as a leisure activity and to promote the use of libraries. Those desires have remained constant over the years, but as Monroe County Public Library looks to the future and the role the library plays in our community, we see libraries as a place that nurtures reading - and so much more.

Our Mission: To enrich lives and strengthen our community by providing equitable access to information and opportunities to read, learn, discover, and create.

We offer some special events this week to help celebrate National Library Week, April 14-20:  Meet author Amy Krouse Rosenthal on Monday, or pick a night Monday through Thursday to attend the Vital Quiz Bowl which supports adults learners.

But you can come in any time to find fun materials to read, or view or listen to. You can even share your thoughts about what you've read by creating your own local review. Access our Research Tools to learn something new like how to make smart financial decisions with Morningstar, or learn a new language with Mango Languages. Check our calendar and discover opportunities to take part in special events and participate in community organizations at the library. Use our public computers to connect to Scratch and create your own interactive story.

These are just a few of the ways we strive to help Monroe County residents read, learn, discover and create. We have big plans for additional opportunities as we develop a Digital Creativity Center especially for teens, expand our meeting room facilities, and increase access to ebooks and other downloadable materials. These initiatives stem from expressed needs and desires of our community members.

Read more about our vision for the future, and MCPL's Strategic Plan to help us get there together. This week, and every week, we'd like to learn from you: How do you use the library to Read, Learn, Discover and Create? And what more would you like your library to be - and do for you?

Oskar Loves Letters!

This is Oskar playing his favorite game. He knows the names of all the letters in the alphabet and he loves to take these magnetic letters off the wall and carry them to his parents. They were wise to help him make learning fun. All children need to know the names of the letters and the sounds they make before they begin school and learn to read. Oskar is on his way to becoming a great reader!

As Oskar grows, his parents can expand on his knowledge by introducing new games about the look and sound of letters. Here are some ways all caregivers of young children can grow a young child's letter knowledge.

  • Point out the shapes of toys and other objects, and talk about how they are alike and different. Comparing and contrasting shapes helps children notice the differences between letter shapes.
  • Help your child notice environmental print such as names on food cartons or words on road signs. Point out letters as you go through daily routines.
  • Play games like, "We are going to go to a place to eat that begins with the letter M. Where do you think we are going?"
  • Talk about the letters that are most interesting to your child, like the beginning letter of his or her first and last names. Help your child find those letters on signs, food boxes, mail, and other objects. Repeat this activity using the beginning letter of other things your child likes.

Read more about our Learn and Play Space here, then visit us and help your child find fun ways to learn!

April is National Poetry Month

ISBN: 
9781423108054

Sonnets, Haiku, Free Verse... Shel Silverstein, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost... There is a poet and style of poetry to suit you. You can sample a wide range of poetry in the juvenile nonfiction collection between 808.81 and 821.92: individual poems, collections of poems, poems to ponder silently to yourself, poems to read aloud. If you want to memorize a special poem, you might peruse a collection like: Poems to Learn by Heart, selected by author Caroline Kennedy, pictured to the left.

You can also create your own poem -- from your imagination or observation. If you look carefully enough, you can find poems all around you -- like on the spines of books at the library -- just waiting to be discovered:

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Find other ideas for celebrating National Poetry Month at ReadWriteThink. Read more »