Information, Answers & Reviews

2013 Free Community Tax Service

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Monroe County Public Library 303 East Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington

February 4 - April 12

Monday and Tuesday: 2:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Friday: 2:00 pm - 5:45 pm

(Arrive early - signup begins at 1:30 p.m. - first come, first served)

 

Ellettsville Branch Library 600 W. Temperance St., Ellettsville, Phone 812-876-3383

February 1 - April 12 (Call for an appointment.)

Friday: 10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Saturday: 12:30 pm - 2:30 pm

 

Other locations:  see http://www.monroeunitedway.org/freetaxes

 

 

 

Escape With the 2013 Winter Reading Program

WRP 2013Adult, high school and middle school readers are encouraged to participate in our annual Winter Reading Program. It's easy to enter - read a book, submit an entry. Every week, winning names will be drawn to receive prizes, and a final prize will be given at the end. The more books you read, the more chances you'll have to win.

Enter anytime between January 2 and February 25 at any library location - Main, Ellettsville or the Bookmobile - or online.

Need help finding a great winter read? If you haven't already, check out MCPL's online book lists. Whether you are craving contemporary British novels, non-fiction about cold places or for a little of everything try a book that library staff loved in 2012. Check out a book today and escape!

Paris: a Love Story

ISBN: 
9781451691542

The defining moment of Kati Marton's life occurred when she was six and the police came for her mother during the Hungarian Revolution. Her mother was imprisoned for a year, joining her father in prison. The authorities forced Marton and her sister to move in with strangers. Before that their lives had been blessed especially by Communist Hungary standards. Kati's parents had hired a French nanny and she learned to speak French as a child.

If you love Paris or even if you are just curious about life in the famous city, this memoir makes a good read. I wasn't familiar with Kati Marton's books or journalism - she worked as a foreign correspondent for ABC news and NPR - so this memoir made a nice introduction to her work.  

Marton was one of the first women to be hired as an international corresponded for ABC.  She met Peter Jennings in London before beginning her post to German in the 1970s. They fell in love and began an international romance that was mostly centered in Paris. But before that Kati had studied abroad in the city of light during the momentous year of 1968. She came from the States where her parents had emigrated after leaving prison. Read more »

NoveList Plus is A+ for Readers

What can you do when your favorite author doesn't write fast enough?  When you finish a series do you have a hard time finding something else to read?

Using NoveList Plus, you can find suggestions for similar authors or series, lists of award winners, as well as the order of books in a series.  Book lists and book discussion guides can help you find a new favorite book or author.

 In NoveList Plus, you'll find:

  • Fiction and nonfiction titles for all ages
  • Expert reading recommendations from professional librarians
  • Read-alikes for every title, author, and series
  • Easy-to-use interface designed with readers and librarians in mind
  • Simple but effective searching
  • Quick and easy-to-use resources including:
    • Book Discussion Guides
    • Thematic book lists
    • Reading and book-oriented articles

 

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Try NoveList Plus, a great resource for finding your next favorite book.

Three Day Road

Three Day RoadI read a review of Three Day Road, Joseph Boyden's first novel of World War I, which mentions that this isn't necessarily an anti-war novel.   I had to read the sentence in that review several times to make sure I wasn't misreading or misunderstanding.  Does a war novel have to come out and specifically declare a stance? 

Really, Boyden includes anti-war elements right up to the breathtaking ending: senseless killings, madness, morphine addiction, shortsighted military leadership, dehumanization, and the day to day terror.  The characters in this book do seemingly impossible and horrible things in the name of combat.  Is that not stance enough?  Is it even important?

It is true that this book is about more than the descent into the hell of trench warfare.  It is a really poetic story of Xavier Bird and Elijah Whiskeyjack, Cree Indians who have grown up in Canada near Hudson Bay.  They have spent their childhood patiently hunting, skills which serve them well as snipers in some of the worst battles of World War I, including around Vimy Ridge and the Somme.  Maybe it needs to be said, but being good at killing moose to survive the winter is different than being good at killing Germans. Xavier and Elijah react differently, but equally destructively, to war. Read more »

The Man on the Third Floor

ISBN: 
9781579622855

 

I journeyed back into the 1950s with this novel about a closeted gay editor. It's all here: the strong prejudice against homosexuality, the gender stereotyping, the cold war, the loyalty oaths, friend turning against friend and colleague against colleague. Some accused Communists leap out high-rise windows when their livelihoods are destroyed.

But McCarthyism is just a side issue in this intriguing novel - The Man on the Third Floor centers on a very successful editor who has a secret domestic life. When he and his wife, Phyllis, and their two young children move back to New York after the World War II years in Washington, Phyllis decides they can afford a house of their own. They finds a nice brownstone with three floors, the top of which was originally servant quarters. But Phyllis is a modern woman, college-educated who worked in radio and journalism until she had children, and she's not keen on having servants live with them. 

But one day, a very handsome man comes to measure Walter's office for new carpeting.  Although Walter has had only one sexual experience with another male in his life--he was raped at camp as a teenager--he immediately finds himself inviting Barry, the carpet man, to a bar. Almost immediately, he offers him a job as a driver despite the fact the family owns no car, and soon gives him a room on their third floor. For some reason, Phyllis agrees to both ideas. Read more »

Self Service Scanning is Here!

MCPL is experimenting with a self-service scanning station that provides an easy way to convert paper documents, photos and drawings into a digital format.

The "Simple Scan" station is an easy to use touch-screen scanning device that scans, saves, and sends all your documents, photos, magazines and more. The Simple Scan Station can automatically auto-crop, auto-straighten and auto-orient each page scanned.

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You can save your scanned item in the following formats:

  • PDF's
  • Searchable PDF
  • Word
  • TIFF
  • JPEG

 

After you decide how you want your scanned item saved, Simple Scan's touch screen guides you through several ways to save or send it including:

  • Save to USB
  • Send to email
  • Send to Google Docs

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We would like library patrons to try it out and help us decide whether we should keep the stations. Stop by the Elletsville Branch or the Main Library (second floor Reference Desk) to try one out today.

Bernie

ImageBernie stars Jack Black in the title role based on the true story of Bernie Tiede, a man in his late 30s who was a funeral director in the small town of Carthage, Texas. Bernie, a beloved member of the tight-knit community, lends his musical talents to community theater and church, coaches children's teams, and helps out in any way he is able. He also befriends the grieving widows of the town. He attempts to console Marjorie Nugent (Shirley McLaine) the much despised recent widow of the town's richest man. Initially Marjorie shuns Bernie, but one day invites him into her home. From there the pair develops a very close relationship. They take trips together, enjoy musical performances and dine out- all on Marjorie's dime. Marjorie, who previously had no friends and was estranged from her family, becomes increasingly demanding of Bernie and his time. She also comes to depend on him to take care of her personal needs and finances. As time passes people start to realize Marjorie has not been seen for awhile and questions arise. Enter Danny Buck Davidson (Matthew McConaughey), the local district attorney, who is especially suspicious of Bernie.

This film was nominated for several awards recognizing independent films. All of the stars give excellent performances, especially an understated Jack Black who was nominated for a Golden Globe. In a stroke of genius, director Richard Linklater intercuts the story with interviews featuring the actual townspeople of Carthage, who without exception like and trust Bernie. This film is oddly touching and darkly humorous. Be sure to watch through the credits at the end to see photos of the real Bernie and Marjorie, as well as footage of Bernie talking with Jack Black.

 

Marilyn & Me: A Photographer's Memories

ISBN: 
9780385536677

This slim memoir about one of the great stars of cinema is a quick and easy read. As you might guess, it provides some really fine images of the star that you might not have seen. Yet because of the book's small format, the photographs are not as big as you might hope.

The photographer, memoirist Lawrence Schiller, was only 23 years old when he first got the opportunity to photograph the actress. What I like especially in this book, is how he humanizes Marilyn, shows how uncertain she was, longing yet afraid to have a child; Schiller started his family over the couple year-span of the memoir and they often talked about his wife and family.

Marilyn & Me shows the actress to be incredibly smart.  Also, Schiller reveals her skills at conversation--when she was in the right mood--she could really draw people out. On the day she met the author, she discovered that he had blindness in one eye caused by a childhood accident. This fact she never forgot. Read more »

Library Staff Recommended Books for 2012

ISBN: 
9781594744761

I love the long winter nights of December and January for reading. You can start a book at dusk, and if you're lucky and don't get distracted, finish it before bedtime. It's also a good time of year to discover new authors, subjects you've never investigated, and different formats. (Power up that e-reader!) Magazines, newspapers, and websites also offer their best book lists this time of year.

Librarians have the advantage of being able to browse the stacks and the new book section often. Frequently, they employ the magic of serendipity, accidently discovering that dynamic cover that draws one inside a book, or they notice a title on the cart they've seen reviewed, or find themselves staring at a never-read classic that's been on their lists for years. It's also a great place to overhear book gossip, "That's the best book I've read in months."

In the spirit of sharing new authors and titles, I asked our staff members to recommend a favorite book of the year.  Most recommended fiction but the nonfiction reads looked just as interesting--everything from visual essays about daily life in Christoph Niemann's Abstract City to Susan Cain's account of introverts in a book titled appropriately enough Quiet: the Power of Introverts in a World that Can't Stop Talking. Also, recommended was Ian Frazier's On the Rez, an absorbing description of current life on an Indian reservation.  Not to be left out is the terrifying Escape from Camp 14--a young man's account of growing up in a brutal labor camp in North Korea and after living through countless horrible events, he escaped and experienced an outside world that he did not even know existed.  

The fiction includes such enticing titles as Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet by David Mitchell and Alan Campbell's Damnation for Beginners (about life in Hell, where else?).  There's much more from mysteries to sci-fi and young adult fantasy. Thanks to everyone who contributed. Here's the link if you would like to examine the whole list. And we'd love to hear what books you liked this year.

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