Oh, the Thinks You Can Think

Crafting Summer Fun!

Summertime is a wonderful opportunity for children and parents to build special memories and discover hours of simple fun.  Kids can create a masterpiece painting with milk-based paint or use a mixture of shaving cream and glue to make a puff paint mural. (Recipe below)   Write secret codes to one another with invisible ink and then hide them around the house or in the yard.  Combine imagination, pasta plus glue and you can design a “Pasta Creation” with different shapes of pasta, or go for a nature walk and build a picture from whatever treasures you collect. Abundant ideas can be found in the many books we have here at The Monroe County Public Library Children’s Department.  A few titles you might consider are:

Glues, Brews, and Goos

Vols. 1 & 2

By Diana F. Mark

Making Art with Sand and Earth

By Gillian Chapman and Pam Robson

Kids’ Crazy Art Concoctions

By Jill Frankel Hauser

 

Here’s a simple recipe for Puffy Paint!

Mix equal parts white glue and foamy shaving cream – color with some food coloring.

Paint an original work of art and then let it dry – paint will puff up!

 

*Remember!

Crafty Creations

Our Tuesday morning art program begins again June 25th at 10:45 am!

 

Summer Reading Fun: Beginning Reader Book Club

Q is for DuckLike any skill, reading takes practice. For young children, “practice” can sound like a chore. Sometimes reading is more fun when friends and family join in. Book clubs provide an opportunity to read and discuss books socially, even helping children make the connection between reading and “real life.” What’s more, learning to read requires lots of skills that do not involve decoding words on a page. Drawing, writing, storytelling, rhyming, word play, and meaningful discussion, all play a part in a child’s comprehension of text. Our Beginning Reader Book Club includes all of these activities, along with the opportunity for adults and children to read together. Some of our featured books include: Q is for Duck: An Alphabet Guessing Game, Penny and her Song, and Scaredy Squirrel Goes Camping.

Our Beginning Reader Book Club meets for three Thursdays (June 13, June 20, & June 27) from 1-1:45pm in the Children’s Program Room. Please register by phone (349-3100) or through our website (mcpl.info/childrens). Hope to see you there!  

   

How Gutenberg Changed the World

While some predict the imminent demise of the printed book, some profess that the printed book will continue on in perpetuity. I stand with the second group. As much as I enjoy the convenience of ebooks, there is a majesty to a beautifully illustrated and bound printed book that not even the most colorfully animated ebooks can equal. There is so much ephemeral electronic correspondence today that a printed book, by its sheer mass and substance commands a certain amount of respect. Or, perhaps it's simply the history of the printed book that I revere.

From the Good Mountain: How Gutenberg Changed the World lavishly presents the early history of the printed book as pioneered by Johannes Gutenberg in 1450.  Categorized as a biography, this new picturebook by James Rumford focuses more on Gutenberg's revolutionary invention of the printing press, than on the life of Gutenberg himself. Each richly illustrated double-page spread describes the process of creating a book as a mystery of sorts, asking the reader to guess the elements that formed the finished product: "What was this thing made of rags and bones?" and answering on the next page: "It was paper, and it was ready."

The epilogue to this book notes that Gutenberg's invention remains a bit of a mystery, as no one knows for sure how he was able to produce such beautifully crisp and clear letters in the 1400s. But some of the books he produced more than 500 years ago endure to this day. In fact a copy of one of those books resides in Bloomington at the Lily Library on the campus of Indiana University. The Gutenberg Bible rests in a glass case on display in the Lily Library, open for anyone to visit. 

From the Good Mountain concludes with an illustration of computer circuitry, suggesting that as hand copied books gave way to printed ones, and printed books give way to ebooks, perhaps it doesn't matter at all what books look like -- what form they take -- as long as people keep writing and reading them. What are you reading today?

Oskar Loves Letters!

This is Oskar playing his favorite game. He knows the names of all the letters in the alphabet and he loves to take these magnetic letters off the wall and carry them to his parents. They were wise to help him make learning fun. All children need to know the names of the letters and the sounds they make before they begin school and learn to read. Oskar is on his way to becoming a great reader!

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