Sights and Sounds

Take the 'A' Train to the Library to Learn about Jazz!

April is Jazz Appreciation Month—a great time to learn more about America’s original art form through the Library.

Originating in the 1910s, jazz has roots in African traditions, blues, ragtime, and European classical music. Gary Giddins’ and Scott DeVeaux’s book Jazz traces the genre's evolution from the early twentieth century to the fusion sounds of more recent times, and describes the major influences in its development. In the Emmy-nominated documentary miniseries of the same name, Ken Burns' Jazz traces the music's history from its beginnings in the African-American community of New Orleans.

Music: Hottest Titles, No Wait Required

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PHOTO: AMY CLARKE

Borrowing your favorite music from the Library’s huge CD collection is great, but what happens when something’s checked out—or is a digital-only release? Not to worry: with Freegal and Hoopla, our free online music services, you can still enjoy the current Billboard hits, even if they’re not available in physical form. Stream or download these chart-toppers from the Library today:

Dropkick Murphys: Kiss Them, They’re Irish

Well, maybe not quite.

Listening to the Dropkick Murphys, I’m swept into their Irish-Catholic South Boston neighborhood. The sense of place in their rough-and-tumble songs is simply that strong—and not just on account of the accent coming through in the vocals.

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The Murphys are a curious blend of genres: they’re described as both hardcore punk and Celtic folk, and you can definitely hear both in their music. I’d add unapologetically, jubilantly brash. And raucous. Irreverent. Throbbing with life, vitality, emotion, even a little death. Not above making fun of themselves.

And prolific. This year’s 11 Short Stories of Pain & Glory, peaking at number eight on the U.S. Billboard charts, follows a dozen releases by the Murphys since 1998. You may

Five of my Favorites and So Long

 

Keith Carter in Clown MakeupThis Sight and Sound blog post was perhaps the hardest for me to write of all of my posts.  There are two reasons for this.  The first is because I will retire from the library shortly after this post goes up.  I have had almost forty years at the Monroe County Public Library as either a staff member or volunteer and it is time to move on to another adventure.   I still believe this library is one of the best, if not the best library in the state. But of course, I am biased.  I hope that you and the library will forgive my choice of pictures to head up this post. (I didn’t ask for permission) I’ve always believed that libraries are places of wonder and learning; imagination, and research, but above all, they are places full of fun and life and joy that one can experience almost nowhere else.  There is something special about the books, movies, services and special programs that take place in a library that help make any community stronger and better for all. Young and old, rich and poor; people from every walk of life can find something in common at a good library and there are always interesting people to meet at a library. Some of you may remember me from many different places in the library; when I started I worked at the Community Access Channel, then I moved to the Movies and Music Department, then to Adult Services and have recently begun working at our Ellettsville branch.  I even worked for a while as a night janitor. One of my greatest joys, however, is playing the clown (and the music) for the Children’s Story Hour Extravaganzas and especially the October event for which this picture displays my standard outfit and perhaps the real me.  It is the joyous laughter and smiles of a child who is discovering for the first time the world of the library that I will remember the most after I leave.

So this is good-bye, which is hard.  Harder still, at least intellectually, is the second reason this post was so difficult. Because this will be my last post I am forcing myself to make a choice out of all the movies I have watched over the years to just five of my favorites.

Pushing Daisies

Voices are unique, especially in the world of audiobooks.  For years I worked in the Movies and Music area of the library and paid very little attention to the world of books beyond those in my own areas of interest.  One day I began hearing about a series of books that was taking not only the country but the world by storm; books about a young lad named Harry Potter.  I decided to check them out.  Not having much time to read at the time I decided to listen to the first book in the car on my way to work.  The Harry Potter series was read in the United States audio editions by Jim Dale.  His manner of reading entranced me and brought me into the world of Harry Potter.  I could have listened to him read the phone book and been happy.  I know this is a trite overused comparison, but it is accurate.  So imagine my joy when I watched the first episode of the series Pushing Daisies and heard his wonderful and unique voice starting out “At this very moment in the town of Couer d’Couers young Ned was nine years, twenty-seven weeks, six Days and three minutes old.”  I was hooked just by this voice alone, then as the story progressed I was hooked by the whole show

Pushing Daisies started life as rejected script idea for an episode of the show Dead Like Me, in which the character of “George” Lass finds that she cannot collect any souls because someone was resurrecting the dead by touching them.

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