All Staff Picks

Adults

  • All of the books on this list are scheduled to be released as movies in 2016. Some of the release dates (in paratheses) will probably change or have not been announced yet. Click on the title for more information about the book; Click on the date or "TBA" for more information about the film!

  • Each February the United States celebrates African American History Month, which traces its origins to 1926 when historian Carter G. Woodson designated the second week of February to be "Negro History Week." This week was chosen because it coincided with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. With the rise of the civil rights movement by the late 1960s, Negro History Week had evolved into Black History Month on many college campuses. In 1976 President Gerald R.

  • Enjoy these biographies of well-known and not so well known people from the founding of our country.

  • 2016 marks the centennial celebration of America’s National Parks.  Don’t wait another 100 years. Read about and visit your National Parks this year.

  • College towns are known for a smart, engaged populace, a fondness for team sports, and often, lots of music and bars. But what do books set in university towns tell us about the culture? Here is a sampling of books set in towns like our own.

  • Can you tell a book by its title? Here's a list of zaney, off beat, eclectic, quirky books you may enjoy.

  • June is Adopt a Cat month! Check out one of these non-fiction books about how cats can make a difference in our lives and how we can make a difference in theirs.

  • Celebrate Black History Month by checking out one of these recently published books about African Americans.

  • Celebrate Indiana’s bicentennial year by reading and rereading some outstanding Hoosier author’s works. Between 1900 – 1941, Indiana authors were second only to New York for being on the New York Times Best Seller List. The following list will take you from the early 20th century to our current year, 2016.

  • "Civic engagement means working to make a difference in the civic life of our communities and developing the combination of knowledge, skills, values and motivation to make that difference. It means promoting the quality of life in a community, through both political and non-political processes.

  • May is Older Americans Month and the time when here locally our community holds the Creative Aging Festival to identify and promote best practices to create opportunities for older people to understand their full potential, get involved with creative and civic activities, and find fresh ways to enhance their quality of life.

  • Ever dream of writing a story, graphic novel, biography or memoir? As literary prize-winner E.L. Doctorow said, "Writing is an exploraton. You start from nothing and learn as you go." It's time to begin exploring those inner and outer worlds that only you can describe. Writing, as many authors agree, is like living twice. Start your second life now.

  • If you're tired of whipping up the same old dishes in the kitchen try one of these unique cookbooks for inspiration. From Thug Kitchen to Dr. Who to literary cuisine there's something to motivate everyone to start a new culinary adventure.

  • We all have them. Sometimes we praise them, sometimes we rail against a relative or two, but families have made us what we are, who we've become. These novels and nonfiction books explore domestic life in all its joys, sorrows, perplexities, and anger. For what would our lives be like without this network of people so like and unlike us, who share our memories?

    “In every conceivable manner, the family is a link to our past, a bridge to our future.”  --Alex Haley

  • The following titles are sure to culitivate lively book group discussions. They have been recommended for book clubs by Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, Booklist, Novelist and the librarians at the Monroe County Public Library. All titles are available at MCPL and some are available as "It’s In the Bag" book club kits.

  • Sometimes listening to a book read by the author is even better than reading the book yourself. So choose one of these audiobooks,  sit back and let the authors read to you.

  • Try these novels when you need some inspiration to get yourself outside to the beach, the desert, the woods or a park.  All are suspenseful and have a strong sense of place -- the outdoors and the natural world.  These choices are all the first of a series, so if you like the first one you will have many more to choose from.

  • Maker culture is all about taking the do-it-yourself attitude and adding technology. Check out these titles at the Library for maker projects from wearable fashion to robotics; Arduino ideas to salvaging parts from junk electronics; and even Twitter-monitoring Christmas trees!

  • Aside from what we were taught in elementary school, how many of us have a really in depth understanding of Native American history? This list of carefully chosen titles offers well documented, fascinating accounts of America’s indigenous peoples, going as far back as before Columbus.

  • These books aren't just for people who have a disability, they are for their friends and relatives, as well as anyone interested in learning about the experience of living with a disability. This list includes titles dealing with a number of different types of disabilities and range from memiors and poems written by people with disabilies to practical guides about living with a disability.

  • When the air gets chilly and leaves fall from the trees it’s the perfect time to pick up a scary book. If you’re in the mood for a fright, try one of these recently published horror novels. Choose from tales of the paranormal, a new twist on vampires, exorcism combined with reality television and a variety of other horrors to enthrall you and keep you up at night.

  • Through science we discover how the world ticks, not just the world but the universe. Scientists systematically study nature and the physical and material world. They explore unusual animals (Komodo dragons and gyrfalcons) and everyday ones (dogs and cats) as well as dramatic astronomical and geological events. This year saw three major volcanoes erupt: in Hawaii, Iceland, and Japan. These books will perk your interest in an amazing field.

  • War has always been a popular topic for books, both fiction and nonfiction. While some of these books focus on war, all of them present the experiences of those who serve in the United States military, as well as the impact of their service on their families and communities. One of the nonfiction titles, Soldier Girls, focuses specifically on the lives of three women who served in the Indiana National Guard, including a Bloomington resident. All of these titles provide a look into the world of those who choose to serve our country in the armed forces.

  • Looking for a scary story? Try the short version. Less words; more potential scares per sentence.
    Those of us drawn to Horror as a genre tend to revel in its usually dark atmospheric setting, visceral tone, otherwordly characters, and its prevailing thrill of the Unknown.
    Some would say that our culture's increasing predilection for fantasy, and specifically its craving for Horror, is a way to sublimate our ever-present real world anxiety. In other words, fearing the Unknown in stories is safer than truly admitting our perpetual fear of the actual unknown all around us.

  • For some of us the best part of Thanksgiving and the holidays is not the food or visiting with the old man but a chance for merrymaking with brothers and sisters. This list might remind you of why you miss your siblings and the way they annoy you, defend you, knock you down a peg or two (right when you need it), hold your secrets, lend you money - and how they are the only ones who speak your language.

  • It seems to be human nature to just be focused on events that take place during your lifetime.  So it can come as a shock to find out your family had lives, secrets and happenings from the time before you were born.  The following titles illustrate how these secrets can cause heartbreak or give closure to those who discover them.  For more books check the MCPL online catalog using the search terms: Subject - Family secrets-Fiction.

  • We admit it—being around so many great books at work each day is a dream made real. Enjoy this year’s list of our most recent favorites.

  • This list includes titles that received rave reviews from participants in our adult summer reading program. Our readers found all kinds of treasures to enjoy this summer from thrillers to manga to westerns to non-fiction.

  • Do you need some new ideas for summertime chow? Is it too hot to cook but you still want to eat? Check out these books on home-made ice cream, picnicking, grilling and lighter fare for the hot hot Indiana weather.

  • Spice up your Thanksgiving with one of these intriguing thrillers or mysteries set on or near Thanksgiving. Whether you like a cozy mystery or prefer an edge of your seat thriller there's something for everyone to enjoy during the Thanksgiving holiday. 

  • In the mood for a fast paced book that pulls you in and won’t let you go? Thrillers are action driven stories told at breakneck speed, with sympathetic heroes and deadly villains. If you enjoy authors like Lee Child, David Baldacci or Robert Ludlum then try one of these thrillers.

  • The will to survive can push humans beyond the limits of what seems possible. All of these books tell the true stories of people in seemingly insurmountable circumstances, and yet they survived. From Antarctica to the Amazon, from the ocean to unimaginably deep caves enjoy these thrilling stories of those who survived against all odds.

  • Why not experiment with a different kind of garden this year? How about planting a tea garden? Why not attract bugs? They can be beneficial. Try planting a hellstrip garden. Don't know what that is? Check out the book on this list. Or after spending the afternoon in your garden settle down with one of the gardening memoirs listed here.

  • Here's a selection of Wild Things by and about Maurice Sendak available through the Library. For a more complete list, please see the Sendak-related items in the Library catalog.

Children

Teens

  • Dystopia: An imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degraded one.

    Have you already read all three Hunger Games books and seen all the movies? We've got the cure for your dystopian blues.

  • When feelings of intense fear and distress are overwhelming and prevent us from doing everyday things, an anxiety disorder may be the cause. Anxiety disorders are the most common mental health concern in the United States. An estimated 40 million adults in the U.S., or 18%, have an anxiety disorder.

  • The start of school is right around the corner. Try one of these books to get yourself in the school mood. Set in boarding schools, magical schools, and regular high schools - these stories are guaranteed to make you feel slightly more studious.

  • What is life like for a soldier coming home, after he or she has been exposed to the indescribable horrors of war? And what is it like for the family and friends of the soldier, so happy to have their loved one back, but often sensing the soldier is not exactly as he or she was before leaving? Here are some novels that explore the lasting impact of war and the struggle to "get back to normal."

    Compiled by Emily S.

  • Dragons aren't just fire breathing, treasure hoarding lizards. In these stories they are half human, shape shifters, and comic relief. Try one of these books and discover a new side of a legendary creature.

  • Tales of the fey and re-tellings of classic fairy tales for readers who need a happily ever after or who always wondered what would have happened if Cinderella was a cyborg.

  • Graphic Novels feature some of the best storytelling you'll find anywhere! We bet you can't read just one!

  • Gangsters, kidnappers, and stone-cold killers. We've always been fascinated by crime and those who commit the foul deeds (and those who catch them). These true crime titles explore criminals and cases famous and obscure, and just action-packed enough for teen readers.

  • Books featuring teens who identify as LGBTQIA. These stories present a variety of lives lived in a variety of different ways. Pick one up to experience someone else's struggles or to find comfort in your own.

  • Any time is a great time to read a scary story! Pick up one of these and be prepared to be freaked out.

  • April is National Poetry month. Celebrate by checking out some of these titles with teen appeal - from nature to science fiction, love to death, and free verse to haiku, you're bound to find something to inspire.

    List compiled by Dory L. and Chris H.

  • There are tons of movies that have come out or are coming out based on YA novels. Get a jump on the lines and read the book before you see the movie. It's always better anyway.

  • These recent Young Adult books center on music, from jazz to rock to hip hop and beyond.

  • These books feature many different relationships from the good to the bad. They are realistic portrayals of things that are happening to teens in Bloomington and all over the country. Pick one up to learn, to grow, or to find comfort that you are not alone.

  • People have been scaring themselves silly with creepy stories for a long, long time. Some horror classics simply refuse to die, and are reanimated again and again in modern retellings. As Halloween approaches, check out a new take on an old tale.

    List compiled by Emily S.

  • Want to lose yourself in a romantic story about love between a human and a vampire/werewolf/angel/zombie (seriously, zombie) or are you just looking for a realistic tale of meet cutes and true love? Try one of these with a side of hot chocolate for the perfect romantic night in.

  • Ready, set, go! Start reading the nominees for the 2015-2016 Eliot Rosewater Book Award and vote for your favorite. You just might choose the winner!

  • Maybe you'd like to create a sensational graphic novel. Or craft scripts for TV and film. Or write the next "Great American Novel." Or turn your own life story into a riveting memoir. No matter what your preferred format and focus, writing is undoubtedly hard work. Here are some books filled with both expert tips of the trade and fun and thoughtful writing prompts to help jumpstart your writer's mind. Now get writing!

    Compiled by Emily S.

  • Need a story that jumps off the page and won't let you go? Try one of these fast paced adventures for a read it in one sitting, stay up all night experience!

  • Are you interested in reading some fiction centered around sports?  The following books all have teenage main characters playing sports and learning about life.

  • From the Young Adult Library Services Association -

    The Teens' Top Ten is a "teen choice" list, where you, the teen, nominate and choose your favorite books of the previous year! Exciting, right?! You can participate as long as you are between the ages twelve to eighteen. Reading is a great pastime so we'd love it if you participated!

    Voting will be online. The winners will be announced the week following Teen Read Week (October 9-15, 2016). So if you want to participate in this exciting event, get reading!

  • Check out one of these too good to miss titles for readers in 6-8th grade!

  • Whether your interests are in solving a mystery or getting into the mind of a criminal, these titles have something for you, from missing persons to murder to a touch of the supernatual.

  • Fiction and Non-Fiction titles about teens experiencing homelessness.

Character Traits and Social Skills

  • It's what holds families and friends together during tough times—caring for a family member, friend, or pet helps us grow.

  • Some things are so basic and simple, we can easily know whether they’re right or wrong.

  • I help you a little, you help me a little—we’ll all get a lot more done.

  • Doing the right thing even when you fear the outcome.

  • The first step towards understanding and creativity.

  • With effort comes sense of purpose and pride of accomplishment.

  • Things change and we can’t always anticipate how. That’s when a little flexibility comes in handy—adapting to and making the best of the situation.

  • Friends share your interests, values, goals, and are just plain fun to be around.

  • You can count on a person with a reputation for telling the truth. With others, you are just guessing.

  • Taking control over a situation, instead of the situation controlling you.

  • Don't say one thing and do another.

  • The feeling that life cannot get better than it is at this moment.

  • Planning takes time and effort, but is more efficient and enduring.

  • Letting the moment develop fully before acting.

  • Seeing your goal to the end, never giving up even when the way gets difficult.

  • Feeling good about yourself and what you've accomplished.

  • The more knowledge you bring to a problem, the more likely you are to solve it.

  • Being able to cope with difficulties creatively and spontaneously.

  • Showing consideration. Respect for others goes hand in hand with respect for yourself—you can't have one without the other.

  • Getting the job done when others depend on you.

  • Staying cool, calm, and collected when you want to scream, rage, and holler!

  • Laughter is the best medicine.

  • When people know they can depend on you to do what you say you'll do, to be where you say you'll be, and that you'll always try to do the right thing.